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Women forced to be ‘human coffins’

In a bungalow in suburban Santiago a heavily pregnant woman is lying on a bed of grass. Dressed in her nightgown her face is tranquil; a few beads of sweat gathering at her temples the only sign of a concealed distress. On closer inspection the greenery is arranged in ritualistic fashion, sticks of celery fanning out around the body of the woman like a halo, and as the camera pans down the expectant mother’s body a splash of red flashes across the screen.

International Workers’ Day in Chile

As a reporter for The Santiago Times for the four months in 2012, I had the opportunity of attending many of the marches and protests in the capital here in Chile. These are a few photos from May 1 which is International Workers’ Day worldwide. The march, a family event, started off peacefully but soon […] Read more

Constitutional change is possible, but it will take time, Chilean experts say.

Never has Chile’s population been so vocal about what it wants. Every day, in the country’s capital, in Aysén, and now up in Calama, social movements continue demanding their rights. Impeding these rights in every direction, critics say, is Chile’s political system. Shrouded within the very fabric of this system, lies the remains of Gen. Augusto Pinochet’s most infamous legacy: Chile’s 1980 Constitution.